Special Populations and Exercise

Warrior House News | By Dana Gore
Posted: 21/04/2015 08:04GMT | Updated: 4 years ago

Whilst it is common to read articles and receive advice concerning exercise for the general population, the truth is that not everyone fits into this category.

Nowadays, it seems that the majority of the population fits into a category termed as “Special Population”.

The reason it’s important to understand what Special Populations stands for, and who this pertains to is because the details and standards that go into their exercise programming require a level of care that extends beyond what is usually required for a generally healthy individual.

There are several factors that would place someone into this category, and in an effort to establish a lifestyle of genuine well-being, it is wise to know how to work best with whatever conditions may be present in your life.

[pullquote]The reason it’s important to understand what Special Populations stands for, and who this pertains to is because the details and standards that go into their exercise programming require a level of care that extends beyond what is usually required for a generally healthy individual.”[/pullquote]

So to help offer some clarity, some examples of what constitutes as someone who fits into a Special Populations category are:

  • Children
  • Senior populations
  • Pregnancy
  • Obesity
  • People who suffer from arthritis or who have had shoulder, hip and/or knee replacements
  • Illnesses such as diabetes, end stage renal disease, cancer, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), osteoporosis, fibromyalgia, MS (multiple sclerosis), Parkinson’s disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, peripheral artery disease, and more
  • Low back pain, bulging discs and/or herniated discs
  • People who have had a heart attack or a stroke
  • Hypertension

Regardless, Exercise is Still Beneficial

If you or someone you know falls into a Special Populations category, establishing a safe and structured exercise program is a viable and beneficial activity that may promote a reduction in symptoms, or quite possibly eradicate a specific condition altogether.

The idea is to use sound judgment…and in order to do this, it’s best to know what you’re dealing with so you can design a program that suits your specific needs, or hire someone qualified enough to do this for you.

The first step to take is to discuss the desire to incorporate an exercise program into your life with your physician and find out what, if any contraindications you may have to exercise.

Follow their guidance and suggestions.

If you are obese, or have lived a sedentary life and you wish to start an exercise program, start light and progress yourself safely into a more challenging program as you develop the strength and stamina to do more.

The idea is to make physical activity a regular part of your life in any way you can…and in doing so, you’ll reap the rewards.

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* Source – https://www.acsm.org/docs/publications/2011fallfspn_exerciseforspecialpopulations.pdf?sfvrsn=0

* Source – Fitness Institute International’s Special Populations/Post Rehabilitations Specialist Course Study Outline – http://fitnessinstituteinternational.com/courses/special-populations-post-rehabilitation-specialist-course/

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Dana Gore

Dana Gore

Health and Fitness Professional and Writer at I Choose Awareness
Author of "A Simple Guide to Exercise Safety (What You Don't Know CAN Hurt You)"
Dana Gore

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